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Can Catholics support ‘Black Lives Matter’?

By CNA Staff

Protesters march during a "Black Trans Lives Matter" march against police brutality on June 17, 2020 in the Brooklyn Borough of New York City. (Photo: Angela Weiss / AFP via Getty Images)

CNA Staff, Jun 17, 2020 / 05:29 pm (CNA).- Catholic leaders say the Church has an important role in working for racial justice, but that protesting for justice does not imply endorsement of the positions taken by Black Lives Matter organizations.

The phrase “#BlackLivesMatter” began to trend online following the death of Trayvon Martin in 2012, and a movement grew amid protests and riots in Ferguson, Missouri in 2014 after the shooting of a young black man, Michael Brown, by a police officer.

“Black Lives Matter” has become the rallying cry for a broad social movement. But there are also specific organizations which take the name “Black Lives Matter.” The largest and best-funded of those groups is the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation, which has a network of local chapters around the U.S. and in other countries, and operates the website blacklivesmatter.com.

The Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation promotes LGBT ideology and opposes the nuclear family.

The group’s platform aims to “dismantle cisgender privilege,” and “disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure.”

“We foster a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking,” the group’s website says.

At least one Black Lives Matter network affiliate has incorporated spiritual rituals into protests, drawing from animistic religions by calling forth deceased ancestors and pouring out libations for them. The leaders of Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles say their efforts are more than a movement for racial justice, but are a “spiritual movement.”

Other organizations also use the phrase “Black Lives Matter,” some with different agendas and goals than the global network. But the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation is often correlated directly with the movement itself, and its affiliates often organize local protests.

The organization should be distinguished from the broader social movement for racial justice, said Deacon Harold Burke-Sivers, a black Catholic deacon of the Diocese of Portland, Oregon, author, and co-host of EWTN’s Morning Glory radio show.

“Marching to protest the inequitable treatment of black people by those in authority—that’s good,” the deacon said.

However, the policies espoused by the Black Lives Matter organization on family and sexuality constitute “a radical feminist agenda disguised as a movement for ‘Black Lives Matter,’” he said.

“No Catholic can support the national organization, whatsoever,” he added.

Burke-Sivers encouraged Catholics to act for racial justice, but to pray first.

“Take the life that God has given us in these sacraments, and become the heads and the hands and the face and the heart of Jesus in the world,” he said. “Start with that and then put that into action.”

Saying “Black Lives Matter” is important, EWTN radio host Gloria Purvis, who is African-American, told CNA. She added that neither the phrase nor the movement should be viewed through the lens of only one organization.

“It’s a mistake to say that Black Lives Matter—the organization—is the head of this movement.”

“That’s like saying that one organization is the head of the pro-life movement,” she explained.

The phrase “Black Lives Matter” represents a whole “movement for racial justice,” she said, one which is now global and without one single leader. Using the phrase “doesn’t mean you are now de facto a member of this organization,” she said.

“For me, as a Catholic, a devout Catholic, as a loyal daughter of the Church, I have no problem saying ‘Black Lives Matter,’” she said.

“I know it doesn’t make me a member of the organization.”

Some Catholics hesitate to attend protests or other events because they say that not only “black lives matter,” but that “all lives matter,” she noted.

Purvis explained that the phrase “Black Lives Matter” is not meant to devalue the lives of others, and while all lives do matter, she has observed that “in practice” in the U.S., “what we’ve seen is that black lives don’t.”

As a pro-life Catholic, Purvis said she recognizes the eugenist roots of abortion, but said fighting racism in America shouldn’t be limited to opposing abortion. She said racism is manifested through police misconduct, housing policies, and other aspects of American public life.

Ryan Bomberger, a black pro-life activist and co-founder of the Radiance Foundation, says he does not support the Black Lives Matter movement, because of its hostility to Christianity.

“Every life unjustly killed deserves justice. The question is, how do we pursue that justice? And for me, as a Christian, I cannot embrace a secular movement that is unapologetically hostile to Christianity, in order to pursue justice,” Bomberger told CNA.

While “a lot of people involved” with the movement are acting “out of compassion and love,” he said, “the ones leading are very clear about the objectives of the movement,” Bomberger said.

“It’s the entirety of that manifesto that doesn’t make any attempt to be Biblical in any sense,” he said. “They’re not looking for forgiveness or reconciliation, they’re looking for political power.”

On the relationship of Christians to the Black Lives Matter movement, he said that “my issue is that the church should be leading, instead of sheepishly following a broken secular movement.”

For his part, Bishop Shelton Fabre, chair of the U.S. bishops’ committee on racism, told CNA that Catholics should join efforts to call for racial justice.

“Black Lives Matter has a broad agenda covering many social issues, some of which are not in harmony with Catholic teaching. However, on the issue of standing against the injustice of racism, it is my understanding that Catholic Social teaching and Black Lives Matter are in accord,” the bishop said.

“Because we have a responsibility to bring our faith to the public square, it is appropriate to protest racial injustice,” he added.

In recent weeks, mass protests have occurred in dozens of cities across the country following the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man in Minneapolis.

In some cities there have also been riots, and a section of Seattle has been declared an “occupied protest.”

A Minneapolis police officer who knelt on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes while arresting him, Derek Chauvin, was fired by the department and has since been charged with second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd’s death. Two other officers who knelt on Floyd, and one bystanding officer, have been charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

Amid the weeks of protest, both the Black Lives Matter movement and organization have gained increased national attention.

Now-retired Bishop Edward Braxton of Belleville, who is African-American, wrote a 2016 pastoral letter on the Catholic Church and the Black Lives Matter movement.

In that letter, Braxton said the Black Lives Matter movement doesn’t have one leader or organizer.

“The phrase is more a call to action against racial profiling, police brutality, and racial injustice than a specific organization. The media and the public often associate a variety of unconnected groups with Black Lives Matter, when they are actually not structurally connected,” the bishop noted.

However, Braxton noted that most leaders in the Black Lives Matter movement he had encountered reject the Church’s teaching on sexuality, marriage and abortion.

Others in the movement, he said, are reluctant to work with the Church because they think Catholics have not done enough to fight racism, he wrote.

Braxton wrote that there are “profound differences” between the teachings of the Church and the Black Lives Matter movement, and that many leaders in that movement do “not embrace traditional Christian theological ideas about praying to keep the peace and change hearts.”

“They embrace a radical theology of inclusion inspired by a revolutionary Jesus,” he wrote.

The bishop nevertheless encouraged Catholic engagement with leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Do differences “necessarily mean that a representative of the Church cannot have a meaningful conversation with representatives of the movement about these and other issues where there may be greater accord?” the bishop asked.

Braxton wrote that his dialogue with members of the movement had allowed him to present Church teaching on poverty and race, as well as on marriage, sexuality, and human dignity.

The bishop said that in dialogue, he “explained that the Church’s social doctrine may be more forceful than they think. I also pointed out that Catholic beliefs about the nature of marriage, the meaning of human sexuality, and the dignity of human life from conception to natural death are not mere cultural norms or social issues. The Church cannot and will not change these moral doctrines. These beliefs represent what the Church firmly holds to be fundamental moral principles rooted in human nature, natural law, biblical revelation and the teachings of Jesus Christ.”

Braxton wrote that all Catholics have an obligation to work for racial justice in the framework of Catholic teaching about the dignity of the human person, and the sanctity of human life, and to work, above all, for conversion.

“The Church has a grave responsibility to contribute to the ongoing conversion and spiritual transformation of us all. Working tirelessly day by day, we are co-workers with Christ.”

Amid the ongoing protests, Bishop Fabre encouraged Catholics to take seriously the unique role they can play in promoting an end to racism.

The present moment, Fabre said, presents an “extraordinary opportunity” with many Americans taking an active part in protests against racism and police brutality. However, he said, the work still remains to be done “to dismantle racism.”

“We should be seeking what unique role God might be asking the Catholic Church to play in transforming opportunity into a watershed moment in eradicating racism,” he said.

African-American Catholics have suffered from racism within the Church for “decades and centuries,” he said; sometimes it has taken the form of “parishes not welcoming the ministry of a black priest or deacon,” he said, “or parishioners not wanting to receive the Eucharist from an African-American extraordinary minister of holy communion.”

Black Catholics “long for the eradication of racism in the Church through encounter, accompaniment, repentance, justice, action, charity, and prayer,” he said.


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105 Comments

  1. Just to answer the headline: No, Catholics can’t support it. Reason matters, and the Black Lives Matter people are utterly unreasoning and unreasonable, appeal to nothing but emotion and ignorance and unthinking passion, and shouldn’t be supported by any sentient being.

      • Certainly. I don’t see the Black Lives Matter cares anything about the 325,000+ black babies who are aborted every year.

      • Jesus loves ❤️ everyone without exception! Jesus is truly at the heart ❤️ of the matter! Only God knows what is in the heart ❤️ and soul of each and every child of God! Only God is the true and just judge – judge ye not lest ye be judged! FIAT ❤️!

      • We cannot support this. It is a radical group. We are called to pursue justice by peaceful means. BLM and the cops are both in the wrong and we cannot fully support what each group is doing. Yes we can agree with some aspects of it but we cannot support it. The radicals want to undermine civil authorites and destroy them. The police represent a system of justice. Yes it can be flawed but we cannot eliminate it but call for boundries to be imposed on them which respect human dignity. As Christains we cannot support an orginization that undermines civil authority. We are called to demand reform not destruction. The BLM movement does not want to save black lives but further the radicalk agenda. They want the police to be replaced by civilians. This is essentially a police force. However it will be a radical police force that is far worse than ours.

      • Vincent Simmons life matters but BLM have done nothing to help him. Please pray for him. A true victim of Racism. The left are selective, rather look back a hundred years than help a black man today. #FreeVincentSimmons

    • Good point, but it is even more serious than being unreasonable. If people are simply irrational, there is still a hope that they can be reasoned with at some point, and that reason will ultimately prevail. But we’re really dealing with ideologues, people who mindlessly commit to a belief system regardless of facts, critical thinking, and historical realities. That actually makes them quite dangerous at all kinds of levels.

    • Thea Bowman – religious sister, civil rights advocate, candidate for sainthood;
      https://www.catholicworldreport.com/2020/06/18/thea-bowman-religious-sister-civil-rights-advocate-candidate-for-sainthood/

      What does it mean to be black and Catholic?,” asked Sr. Thea. “It means that I bring myself, my black self.”

      “I bring my whole history, my traditions, my experience, my culture, my African-American song and dance and gesture and movement and teaching and preaching and healing and responsibility as gift to the Church.”

    • Why are we allowing the conversation on sexual morality to question BLM?
      The focus must be how to effectively apply our framework of sexual morality to our church leadership in order to protect our youth. We the body of Christ have a moral responbility to remove the branch from our own eye first before we presume to see the splinter in our brother’s.
      Children that are not protected grow into adults that repeat what church leaders demomstrate to be physically and morally “acceptable”

    • Let us never forget the words of St. John Paul ll, “When people are oppressed and all peaceful means to end it have been exhausted, then violence may be used.” The Black Lives Matter movement is being demonized because of either this or that. Let us focus on what is being protested. Strike against racism and let people of the United States live what the Constitution guarantees.

      • Please provide a source for that alleged quotation, which I cannot find.

        The “Black Lives Matter” movement is demonizing itself by engaging in violence and destruction, injustice, and general stupidity.

        And what racism would that be? Provide specific examples, please. One that isn’t a fabrication, a la the lie that is “hands up, don’t shoot.”

        • The source for St. John Paul ll’s quote of, “When people are oppressed and all peaceful means to end it have been exhausted, then violence may be used”, can be found in a sermon from one of the trips of the Holy Father to Central America. He was not saying anything new, its always been this way.

          In my personal opinion, when oppression is fought with violence then there will be destruction. That’s common sense.

          “And what racism would that be?” A specific example would be this, In the City of Corcoran CA, there was a very sick man who went to the Hospital ER. The Doctor (A known racist) denied the Hispanic man Medical attention, refusing to call the sick mans own Doctor. She instead called 911 and claimed the sick man was threatening to kill her and she feared for her life, this was an outrageous lie. Police came and gave the sick man a severe beating, causing injuries that required surgery. The sick man was arrested, the Police couldn’t figure on what charges to file. The sick man was dragged through an unjust Court System. This mans life was destroyed as was his wife’s and children’s lives. This is just one example of racism. The sick man had no Constitutional rights. The City Government, Police Department, 2 Hospitals, the Judge, the courts, lawyers, the Sheriffs department etc… treated this man like a dog, actually dogs are treated better. The name of this man is Andrew Angelo Pacheco. This is not a fabricated story. This is how Hispanics and Blacks are treated on a routine basis.

          A man’s dignity should never be taken away. God will be the sole judge of those who practice injustice.

          • “a sermon from one of the trips of the Holy Father to Central America.”

            I am still not able to find it. Can you tell me which country, and when?

            “In the City of Corcoran CA,… The name of this man is Andrew Angelo Pacheco.”

            I can’t find any information on the case. Could you provide me with a link, please? When did it happen?

        • I do not write down every source of information that I have memorized. As for the case of Andrew Angelo Pacheco, why do you want to know about the case, are you a lawyer? I hope so, you can help me to battle to undo the racial legal injustice against me. But if you are not a lawyer, why would you want to know?
          If I give you the case number or rather numberS! Would this help you to battle the real injustice of the reality of racism? Or are you trying to find proof of no racism.

          • Oh, I see, your screen name isn’t just a tribute to the man, you are that man.

            I wanted to know about the case because while I have heard one side of it I have not heard the other. I don’t know you, so I have no way of knowing whether I can accept your word for what happened. There have been cases of people being mistreated because of their race. There have also been cases where people were falsely accused of mistreating others because of their race.

            As for the alleged quotation from St. John Paul II, since I cannot find it or anything even remotely similar to it, I must believe that you are either remembering incorrectly or misrepresenting what he said. I am open to correction if someone can provide me with a source.

      • “Strike against racism and let people of the United States live what the Constitution guarantees.”

        Amen, brother. We agree there, and I will do my best. But I am curious to know, must my black brothers and sisters rely on whites as a group to be free? Are they that helpless? Have they no agency?

        • The reason for the rioting is because people are heard but are outright ignored. Whites, Hispanics, Blacks, Asians etc.. All are Americans, we have constitutional rights which are denied to people because of the color of their skin. This has to end! We as a people need each other. God said to St. Catherine of Sienna, that it was His will that there be rich and poor. The rich need the poor by giving them jobs in order for the rich to remain rich, while the poor rely on the rich for jobs that feed their families. We need each other but we all must respect the dignity of each human being. So there is a reason for the rioting; no constitutional rights, no respect for dignity, treated according to the color of one’s skin in a negative manner. I wish the rioting to end, but the only way to end it is to reform Law Enforcement. What an ugly situation when Law Enforcement and all the corrupt people who uphold the injustice against someone because of race is disgraceful!

          • “no constitutional rights, no respect for dignity, treated according to the color of one’s skin in a negative manner. I wish the rioting to end, but the only way to end it is to reform Law Enforcement. What an ugly situation when Law Enforcement and all the corrupt people who uphold the injustice against someone because of race is disgraceful!”

            We all have Constitutional rights, and there is not as much racism in law enforcement as you seem to think. In order to convince me otherwise, you would have to prove to me that, for example, a large number of black people who are arrested did not in fact commit a crime, and that at the same time many white people who have committed a crime are not arrested. I have seen no statistics indicating that that is the case.

    • Correct, Leslie. Black Lives Matter is an ideology, which is the opposite of Christianity. Marxism in all its forms is contrary to reason, faith and Jesus’ love. “Dialogue” with ideologues means giving up on God’s Truth for purposes, however disguised, of secular power. Love the members of BLM, of course, and pray for them and teach them Truth; and don’t be tempted by their sentimental rhetoric.

      • There is in fact a way to see that there is racism and injustice for people of color. Come to my area in California, attend a court session, look around with clear vision. 95% of those being prosecuted are Hispanic. 4% are Black and 1% are white. Listen to the charges, listen to the judge. At the end it will be a great shock to anyone how this is all racism. After this no one who tries to ignore or deny that there is no racism will be able to deny it without a clear conscience. Don’t ask for links, go and see for yourself.

        • In order for me to consider that the percentage of Hispanic, black, and white people who are being prosecuted indicates racism, I would have to know whether those percentages match the percentage of those committing the crime. That is, if 95% of crimes in that jurisdiction are committed by Hispanics, 4% by blacks, and 1% by whites, then the prosecution statistics would not indicate either racism or injustice. It also wouldn’t hurt to know the ethnic or racial makeup of the area.

          It is highly impractical (and that’s putting it mildly) to insist that one must “go and see it for yourself.” How many cases would you insist need to be seen? In how many courtrooms? For how long would one need to attend each individual trial? All this while completely ignoring one’s personal and professional responsibilities while staying in your area of California?

          If you cannot provide links to statistics that support your argument, I simply can’t take your argument seriously.

          • Anything in order to avoid the truth! Isn’t that the way things are today? Since there are those who are so adamant that racism is a myth, I would quote St. Thomas Aquinas, “For those who believe no explanation is necessary. For those who do not believe no explanation is possible”. The evil of racism has been in our face since the United States was founded. We have a case here of “lets not talk about it and the problem will go away”. The rioting today is the direct effect from those who have the face of racism staring at them in the face, and yet they call racism a myth. If racism continues to be ignored, things could get uglier. And it will be ALL the fault of those who want to fantasize that racism is a myth. Wake up and be realistic. We have the Constitution, honor it!. Or please do not call yourself a Patriotic American,

          • Let’s start with that quotation that is allegedly from St. Thomas Aquinas.

            1. It is generally cited as ““To one who has faith, no explanation is necessary. To one without faith, no explanation is possible.” It is about faith in God, not belief about some earthly theory or idea.

            2. One sees it all over the place on the Internet. What one doesn’t see is an actual source for it. Not one single citation that I can find says in which work, which book, which letter, which whatever, it appeared. There is no evidence that St. Thomas wrote it, that I can find. If you can provide a source, please do.

            Failing that, providing a made-up quote as part of your argument doesn’t support it. I could write, “Well, but St. Thomas Aquinas wrote, ‘He who sees racism in everything sees falsely.'” Since I provide no credible source for the quotation, I would not be supporting my argument.

            “The evil of racism has been in our face since the United States was founded. We have a case here of ‘lets not talk about it and the problem will go away.'”

            No, we have a case of “Prove to me that, as the rioters claim, racism is ‘systemic’ and widespread.” Which you haven’t done.

            “The rioting today is the direct effect from those who have the face of racism staring at them in the face,”

            No, it isn’t. You could make an argument that the peaceful protestors are a direct result of people who believe that there is widespread racism (which doesn’t make it true). The rioting is being done by Marxists and anarchists who hate the country, and indeed any organized government, and hate the Church’s teachings on human sexuality, and the nuclear family. Read the “Black Lives Matter” mission statement. It’s full of disgusting tripe. And in providing cover for them, you are supporting it.

            “and yet they call racism a myth. If racism continues to be ignored, things could get uglier. And it will be ALL the fault of those who want to fantasize that racism is a myth. Wake up and be realistic.”

            There are people who are racist. Some of them are white, some of them are black, some of them are from every culture on the plant.

            However, blaming everything on “racism” is shoddy thinking. I cite your claim about the percentages of black, Hispanic, and white prosecutions where you live. You failed to address my perfectly reasonable point that it cannot be presumed that it is due to racism that a higher percentage of one race or culture is prosecuted without considering whether that race or culture commits more crimes. As Cheryl pointed out in another thread, is sexism the reason that the overwhelming majority of those imprisoned for serious crimes is male? Or is it that the overwhelming majority of serious crimes are committed by males?

            “We have the Constitution, honor it!.”

            In what way do you think that I am “dishonoring” the Constitution? Please cite an article, or even a sentence, that I am violating.

            “Or please do not call yourself a Patriotic American”

            I do not consider it unpatriotic to condemn the actions of vicious anti-American bullies who are rioting, assaulting people, destroying property, and attempting to overthrow the government.

          • Sad you are a die-hard link collector. Can you give us links of the documented cases of racism? In which there are myriads of them, be fair and read them. Your comments seem to be filled with hatred. I have not read anything that is positive from you. Would you like a link to that fact? I ask with all due respect, why do you harbor so much hatred against BLM and their demand to be treated as the Constitution guarantees them? Are you a racist?

          • “Sad you are a die-hard link collector.”

            By “die-hard link collector” you appear to mean “someone who refuses to accept what I say just because I say so and instead wants supporting evidence and sources.” You’ll notice that I didn’t request links, but evidence and sources. You know, thinky stuff. I’m sure you’ve heard of it.

            “Can you give us links of the documented cases of racism? In which there are myriads of them, be fair and read them.”

            You are the one making the claim; it it for you to provide the supporting evidence.

            “Your comments seem to be filled with hatred.“

            My comments are filled with impatience for people who are advocating evil, promoting Marxism, and committing and encouraging violence and destruction, and for those who encourage them.

            “I have not read anything that is positive from you.“

            Perhaps you haven’t read enough, unless by “positive” you mean “agrees with me unquestioningly.”

            “Would you like a link to that fact?“

            That is not the sort of thing that can be supported by a link, since it is a statement of what you have not read.

            “I ask with all due respect, why do you harbor so much hatred against BLM and their demand to be treated as the Constitution guarantees them?“

            My objections are to their actual goals and behavior, not their alleged “demand to be treated as the Constitution guarantees them.” Unlike you, I am able and willing to provide support for my objections. Just as a few examples:

            “We are self-reflexive and do the work required to dismantle cisgender privilege “

            “Cisgender” is the word used by those pretending that biological sex is meaningless; in other words, denying that “Man and woman He created them.” And you support them in that?

            “We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement”

            So, they are attempting to destroy the family; and you support them in this?

            “We foster a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking, or rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual “

            So, they support the perversion that is homosexual behavior. And do you support them in this evil?

            Those examples are all from the “What we believe” section of the “Black Lives Matter” website.

            As to their Marxism, try reading this: https://nypost.com/2020/06/25/blm-co-founder-describes-herself-as-trained-marxist/

            As to their vandalism, destruction, and violence, here is just one example: https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2020/06/catholic-man-press-charges-black-lives-matter-mob-beat-st-louis-statue-praying-peace-video/

            They, and the violent anarchist group Antifa, cooperate in this behavior.

            “Are you a racist?”

            No. Are you?

      • I will give you a quote “by their fruits you will know them.
        The BLM manifesto says it all & what they bring is not peace harmony & progress.
        Watch your TV – they are the modern Horsemen of the Apocalypse.
        Wake up & use your God given power of observation & reason.
        Are the BLM fruits now on display that which you want as your heritage.
        No practicing Catholic who is a follower of Our Lord Jesus can have anything to do with any advancing of the aims of BLM.
        Any person who claims to be a Catholic & pays even lip service to this organisation is a hypocrite whose immortal soul is in danger.

    • I think we should not be judgemental on matters of race and social justice. The love we know comes from God who gave his only son to all races. We should not justify injustice and murder. We live by God’s Commandments. Thou shalt not kill. Some of the comments do not show compassion and as Christians we should not be the cause of the downfall of others by our indifference to racism and social justice. Black lives matter. They do at this point in time because of police attitude and action. If you cannot see this as an issue, I think it is time to remember and pray for the intercession of one of the very few cannonised Black Saints, Martin Deporres. If anyone has the role of moderating this blog, I think you failing in your duty. How can you allow comments that go against Hid’s Love. I see more hatred in this blog than love.

      • And yet you are justifying injustice and murder by supporting the Black Lives Matter movement.

        And dollars to doughnuts they’d tear down a statue of St. Martin de Porres in a heartbeat.

      • Very well put! Its about time someone puts God first in this matter. May God continue to Bless you. Pope Benedict XVl said, “Charity without Justice is not Charity just as Justice without Charity is not Justice”. This is a perfect measuring stick with which to judge what is happening with the rioting. We must see Christ in all involved, if we do that then God will allow us to see things with His eyes. Thank you for that great comment.

    • All lives matter and as a Catholic , I do not judge a person by his color. God created that person as I was created so it is good. Why are the murders of blacks by blacks never mentioned? Why is it ok that 80% of blacks are murdered by blacks? BLM is a Marxist plot to turn our civilisation up side down. The Marxists use race in order to motivate people. unfortunately the masses that are motivated are ignorant and have no idea of history and only want destruction. Why is white slavery never mentioned .Why is the fact that the Arabs (muslim) were the lords of slavery in Africa, helped by africans, never mentioned .. This is and so much else proves that there are dark forces behind this movement, ANTIFA and others.

  2. Can Catholics support a violent terrorist organisation that vandalizes our Churches and Shrines, and would likely do far worse if their demand for the abolition of the police id achieved? No. Hell no.

    Catholics cannot support BLM anymore than they can support the Ku Klux Klan.

  3. Everyone has crosses and challenges. Some are more visible than others. No one can solve African Americans problems but themselves. Unfortunately, indulging their base emotions harms them most.

    • I must ask if this poor individual, George Floyd, had been a white man would we be talking about this? No, we would not! It’s better education of police as to when to use deadly force and when not to. For myself, this is a decision that I am glad that I do not have to make on a daily basis. We need better training of our police departments and Federal funds should be dedicated SPECIFICALLY for this purpose. ALL LIVES MATTER!

      • That’s not even a hypothetical question. Tony Timpa died under similar circumstances in 2016. I don’t recall seing people rioting in the streets, advocating anarchy, destroying property, and murdering in response.

  4. The Black Lives Matter movement is every bit as bad as the article conveys, not only in its promotion of racial animosity, but it’s promotion of a Marxist agenda as well, in particular, support for abortion and the destruction of the God given institution of the family.

    The slogan” black lives matter” is also in my view, seriously problematic. Those who of their own free will wish to speak those words are free to do so. However, there is now a widespread element of force, threats, bullying, and intimidation associated with the slogan.

    No one should ever be compelled to utter words they do not wholeheartedly endorse. Those who do not believe that these words “black lives matter”, standing alone and without more such as connection with our universal humanity, are and must remain free to speak their minds as they, in the exercise of their conscience and best judgment see fit, without fear of retribution. Some have lost their jobs for simply stating their conviction that “all lives matter”. That is grievously wrong and such a state of affairs must be condemned by people of good will.

    • Good points. Another lie being propagated is “Silence is Violence.” This is nothing more than a manipulative attempt to get everyone on board with the agenda. It’s like a verbal litmus test of whether or not someone is properly “woke.” The dynamics you describe – troubling as they are – are actually nothing new. Totalitarian leftist systems have been using those strategies for quite some time. What you can’t win in the marketplace of ideas, you compel using force.

      • It’s also a throwback to the playground in elementary school. Honestly, when I hear them mindlessly chanting their silly slogans and insults I just want to say, over and over, “I know you are, but what am I?” and “I’m rubber, you’re glue, bounces off of me and sticks to you.”

  5. NO Leslie above is correct. The strongest and largest sphere of Catholic growth is in Africa,while the faithful in the USA and Europe is rapidly dwindling away.Helped along by a Demonic MSM and socialist/democrats who profess their love
    for all things secular & pagan.

  6. This is the actual BLM page, stating their mission. It does not contain the wording you referenced: https://blacklivesmatter.com/about/ . While they clearly state their support for the LGBT community, it does not state anything about “animistic libations.” You are spreading disinformation and fear mongering based on one local chapter apparently going rogue. That’s irresponsible journalism.

    • The article said, “At least one Black Lives Matter network affiliate has incorporated spiritual rituals into protests.” This is not the practice of the entire organization so it would not be on their web page.

  7. The very title of this piece is scary, but to answer the question – no.

    MLK Jr. said ” I have a dream that the day will come when my children will be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

    IMO that day has come, and we white folks, who by the way do NOT have the monopoly on racism, and never have, are in the odd position of being judged by the color of our skin by those whom we judge by the content of their character.

    ALL lives matter, including – especially – those in the wombs of black women.

  8. At least this article’s drivel isn’t as bad as the groveling obeisance that Catholic school principals, superintendents and Catholic university presidents have shown to BLM en masse on their schools’ websites. I won’t kneel before BLM, not even symbolically with a virtue-signaling statement of “allyship” or “solidarity” that decries “systemic racism” in the country and in schools. This is pure political gamesmanship funded by George Soros in an attempt to oust Trump from the White House. Sad to see this publication being weaselly: trying to jump on the bandwagon but not having the courage to go all-in.

  9. Well said! I totally agree with the previous comments. All these protests and “black lives matter“ slogans, I believe, are creating the very racism they claim exists. Yet, it is acceptable to have a Black College Fund, Black Miss America, Black Catholic Prayer Groups…just think what would happen if we wanted to have a White College Fund. Why isn’t that acceptable?

  10. This article is a case study in what an open fraud the Seamless Garment is. Either a garment is seamless or it is not. You don’t get to tear off pieces of it and call it seamless. The Roman soldiers recognized this when they cast lots for Christ’s seamless tunic. In practice the Seamless Garment appears to function as an updated DIY SJW version of the buying and selling of indulgences, that if you are uber in some areas that it earns you an exemption from supporting other areas. Total self-absolution. The words holey, being full of holes, and holy mean two different things. The Seamless Garment is very holey.

  11. I’m grateful to CNA for turning to solid Catholic voices like Deacon Harold, Gloria Purvis of EWTN Radio, and Bishops Fabre and Braxton.

    I’m grateful for the clarity that the BML Global Network organization doesn’t own “Black Lives Matter” as a slogan or a movement; that the phrase “is more a call to action against racial profiling, police brutality, and racial injustice than a specific organization”; and that at least some black Catholics like Purvis believe that saying “Black Lives Matter” is important.

    Bomberger’s view that “the church should be leading, instead of sheepishly following a broken secular movement” is well taken. 

    Unfortunately, the reality is that the Church is very far from leading the effort to dismantle racism. On the contrary, as Bishop Braxton says, there is a long history of black Catholics suffering racism in the Church, and that many working to overcome racism don’t trust the Church because they don’t see Catholics working to fight racism.

    A solid majority of Americans now have a favorable opinion of “Black Lives Matter” as a movement. Right now it’s the black community’s most potent tool against systemic racism.

    It’s discouraging that so many white Catholics are eager for any excuse to condemn it, and have so little regard for black Catholic leaders, but that’s the reality we have to confront.

    • “A solid majority of Americans now have a favorable opinion of “Black Lives Matter” as a movement.”

      A solid majority of Americans also appear to favor contraceptives, abortion, euthanasia, and transgenderism. I think it far better to judge such movements based on their stated goals, tactics, and fruits. On those counts, the BLM movement is, at best, a very mixed bag.

      “Right now it’s the black community’s most potent tool against systemic racism.”

      How so? Seriously: how so?

      And, what is “systemic racism”? Is it racism built overtly into The System, wouldn’t we see it, in some form or fashion, in the laws and policies and procedures? Yet we know there has been (thankfully) a decisive turn against racism in laws, etc. over the past few decades. So, is it just “off the books”, among certain groups of white people? But, if so, how is that the vast majority of these altercations between law enforcement and blacks take place in cities long governed by either Democrats or blacks or both?

      And, while we’re at it, if racism is real, why do we only talk about white against blacks? Or is it only whites who are racist? And isn’t suggesting so itself quite obviously racist?

      “It’s discouraging that so many white Catholics are eager for any excuse to condemn it, and have so little regard for black Catholic leaders, but that’s the reality we have to confront.”

      That’s a pretty broad and unfair brush to use, to put it mildly. I am the father of two children of mixed ethnicity (black/Hispanic and white/Hispanic), the godfather of a boy adopted from Korea, close friends with blacks, Hispanics, Asians, and other minorities, and so I am both sensitive to racism (which, thankfully, I rarely see where I live in western Oregon) and sensitive to how race is used as an ideological weapon against, well, white Catholics with conservative political positions. And, sadly, the animosity toward white Catholics is far more overt than anything I see aimed at blacks. Some of that is because of where I live, of course, but some of this is because many people continue to think racism is THE core moral problem in our country, and I’m quite convinced that is it not, even though racism certainly is a real problem in some places. Put another way, I think the racism that exists in 2020 is far more indicative of a sort of neo-pagan tribalism than of a failed Christianity, and it is the same sort of tribalism that has fostered and encouraged a multitude of other rotten form of tribalism (LGBT, transgenderism, etc).

      • Carl:

        Bishop Braxton identified Black Lives Matter as a movement primarily with racial profiling, police brutality, and racial injustice. If you were to poll Americans on what BLM means to them, at least 6 out of 10 would pick those issues. Among black Americans, it would probably be at least 8 out of 10.

        That’s why Black Lives Matter is a potent tool against systemic racism: because most Americans recognize that racial profiling and police brutality in a context of racial injustice devalues black lives. To affirm that Black Lives Matter is to oppose racial profiling and police brutality in a context of racial injustice.

        You say you’re sensitive to the subject of racism, but you also ask what systemic racism is. Have you made any effort to find out? Have you Googled it? We are friends on Facebook. I’ve addressed it there many times. I would be happy to send you some post links.

        You appear to consider hostility toward whites a more overt problem than racism. Have you read the comments on this very article? Imagine Deacon Harold or Gloria Purvis reading the comments above. How do you think they feel? Is a majority-white church where attitudes like these are common a welcoming one to black Catholics?

        • I’ve known Deacon Harold for nearly 25 years (he was a classmate and we are close friends) and he and I are quite sympatico re: these matters. Which is interesting, I think, as Harold grew up in inner city Newark and has experienced racism (from both whites and blacks). Anyhow, I don’t need an education, thank you. I’ve done plenty of reading, including some of your posts. The fact that I’m not on board with BLM doesn’t mean I’m racist or opposed to Church authority; it means that I am capable of making a rational, non-emotive, prudential judgment about a controversial topic.

          No, I was speaking of my experience here in western Oregon; I think that was clear. Having lived in the Progressive Belly of the Beast since 1991 (Portland and Eugene, Oregon), I think I’m more than qualified to make such statements. And, yes, I have read the comments here as I moderate many of the comments at CWR.

          • Carl,

            Whether you or anyone else is on board with BLM is not a terribly pressing question. What systemic racism is is a pressing question. Deacon Harold has mentioned this topic on occasion. Why are you asking me what it is? Why don’t you ask him?

          • I have. We’ve had a couple of talks about it. Again, we agree. And he is writing a piece for CWR on this topic. Stay tuned.

            I asked you the question because I’ve heard a lot of different arguments for (and against) systemic racism. But I’m especially intrigued by those who assume it and then get irritated when others question it.

          • I wasn’t irritated, Carl. I was a bit shocked. I do encounter recalcitrant Catholics who openly question the reality of systemic racism, or even the persistence of personal racism in America today. I don’t expect that from you.

            I do assume that Catholic theology regarding sinful structures or institutional sin in general can be taken for granted in discussion between knowledgable and faithful Catholics. The 1979 US Bishops Pastoral Letter on Racism discusses some of the systemic effects of racism on American institutions.

            The ongoing social effects, after the abolition of slavery, of punitive labor laws like Black Codes, segregation law, decades of redlining and the unequal administration of the GI Bill after WWII, the unequal execution of “Law and Order” politics, especially the War on Drugs, and the creation of the mass incarceration state on our society are collectively a powerful reality tending to advantage white people and disadvantage black people. I don’t understand the value of questioning this, except for people who want to minimize racism as a topic as much as possible.

        • SDG,
          I’m butting in here but don’t you think “hostility towards whites” is closely related to racism or one in the same?
          I’d imagine that hostility to any group based on race or ethnicity is part of the definition of racism. And we have a wide variety of ethnicities in the US.

          • Mrscracker,

            There are historical reasons for distinguishing racism as a distinctively modern phenomenon from other types of prejudice, bigotry, and discrimination, which are perennial human failings.

            For a conservative source, Dinesh D’Souza, in The End of Racism, discusses racism’s roots in 17th-century pseudoscientific theories of race related to white supremacy; it was also driven by the trans-Atlantic slave trade and agro-industrial mass chattel enslavement of Africans.

            So racism as a distinctively modern phenomenon is historically inseparable from white supremacy. This means that anyone can be prejudiced or bigoted against anyone else (white against black or black against white); and anyone can have racist attitudes or act in racist ways — but the target of racism specifically, as distinguished from prejudice or bigotry, is racial minorities, not white people.

            Black people can have racist attitudes or act in racist ways toward other minorities or even toward other black people, but it’s a category mistake to talk about black people having “racist” attitudes toward white people.

          • SDG, that is nonsense.

            The dictionary definition of racism, which varies only slightly from one dictionary to another, is

            “a belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the various human racial groups determine cultural or individual achievement, usually involving the idea that one’s own race is superior and has the right to dominate others or that a particular racial group is inferior to the others.
            “a policy, system of government, etc., based upon or fostering such a doctrine; discrimination.
            “hatred or intolerance of another race or other races.”

            It does not say “but that only applies if the person whom you hate or of whom you are intolerant is a minority.”

            It must be convenient to be able to redefine words to suit your purpose.

          • Leslie,

            Far from redefining anything, I’m simply following well-established usage in social sciences today and in the study of race particularly. Nor is this a liberal point of view; as I said, arch-conservative Dinesh D’Souza sets out this very account of racism in his book The End of Racism (and whatever else anyone thinks of D’Souza or this book, he gets this right).

            If you know anyone who works for a dictionary publisher, or who is particularly knowledgable about lexicography, they’ll tell you that a dictionary is a blunt tool and not always a reliable guide to the nuances of words.

            The Oxford definition of racism is a bit better than others: “Prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against a person or people on the basis of their membership of a particular racial or ethnic group, typically one that is a minority or marginalized.”

            Collins references the reality of systemic racism in its second sentence: “Racism is the belief that people of some races are inferior to others, and the behaviour which is the result of this belief. Racism also refers to the aspects of a society which prevent people of some racial groups from having the same privileges and opportunities as people from other races.” In other words, racism of this kind is necessarily directed at the disempowered.

            Technically, one need not be the majority to marginalize others and deprive them of privileges and opportunities. The white Afrikaners proved that in apartheid-era South America. So saying that the target of racism must be a minority is a half-truth; more accurately, the target of racism must be marginalized.

            Britannica talks about the origins of the idea of “race” in connection with the trans-Atlantic slave trade and agro-industrial mass enslavement of Africans. Britannica’s discussion of racism is situated firmly in the context of white supremacy, slavery, and related realities.

          • “Far from redefining anything, I’m simply following well-established usage in social sciences today”

            Since the social “sciences” aren’t sciences but are fluffy, inexact, and useless, I really don’t care what their established usages are, today or any other day.

            “If you know anyone who works for a dictionary publisher, or who is particularly knowledgable about lexicography, they’ll tell you that a dictionary is a blunt tool and not always a reliable guide to the nuances of words.”

            “Nuance” is what is invoked when one is changing the meaning of a word from what it is almost universally considered to mean.

            “”Racism also refers to the aspects of a society which prevent people of some racial groups from having the same privileges and opportunities as people from other races.” In other words, racism of this kind is necessarily directed at the disempowered.”

            Oh, yes? Tell that to the people who weren’t able to get into particular colleges or get particular jobs because of affirmative action about their privileges and opportunities.

            “Technically, one need not be the majority to marginalize others and deprive them of privileges and opportunities. The white Afrikaners proved that in apartheid-era South America. So saying that the target of racism must be a minority is a half-truth; more accurately, the target of racism must be marginalized.”

            Basically, your opinion appears to be that white people are all evil racists (especially if they disagree with you), whether they’re in the majority or in the minority, and nobody else can be racist. Tell me: If a white person wandered into a majority-black inner city and was attacked by black people screaming racial insults, would you still claim that they couldn’t be racist because they’re “marginalized?”

          • Leslie,

            Among the virtually infallible rules of Internet dialogue I have learned is this: When people start saying ludicrous things like “Basically, your opinion appears to be that white people are all evil racists” when one has said nothing of the sort and believes nothing of the sort, it means that one’s actual opinions are of no interest to them and no effort at communication, however herculean, will overcome their determination to persist in their hostile misreading.

          • ““Basically, your opinion appears to be that white people are all evil racists” when one has said nothing of the sort and believes nothing of the sort, ”

            One certainy gives every indication of believing something of the sort. You’ve said that only white people can be racist; and you’ve referred to “systemic racism,” which you seem unable or unwilling to define, and accuse any Catholic who doesn’t believe there is such a thing of being “recalcitrant” and get all miffed at him. By making it “systemic,” you are blaming everybody, but since you’ve already said that minorities can’t be racist, that leaves white people to be the system that is racist.

            You further “The ongoing social effects, after the abolition of slavery, of punitive labor laws like Black Codes, segregation law, decades of redlining and the unequal administration of the GI Bill after WWII, the unequal execution of “Law and Order” politics, especially the War on Drugs, and the creation of the mass incarceration state on our society are collectively a powerful reality tending to advantage white people and disadvantage black people.”

            The disadvantages date back not to slavery but to the creation of the “War on Poverty,” not the “War on Drugs,” accompanied as it was by the destruction of the black family. Read, for example, this column by Walter Williams: https://www.dailysignal.com/2017/09/20/black-family-struggling-not-slavery/

            Or these, by Thomas Sowell: https://www.nationalreview.com/2015/07/slavery-didnt-cause-todays-black-problems-welfare-did/

            https://www.pennlive.com/opinion/2015/05/poor_blacks_looking_for_someon.html

            https://thefederalist.com/2020/06/12/to-truly-reduce-racial-disparities-we-must-acknowledge-black-fathers-matter/

            “I don’t understand the value of questioning this, except for people who want to minimize racism as a topic as much as possible.”

            Smugly self-satisfied, much?

          • Leslie,

            “You’ve said that only white people can be racist…”

            Not only did I not say that, I repeatedly, emphatically, categorically stated the opposite. I was not unclear. You don’t misunderstand because I was unclear, you misunderstand because you read with hostility.

          • You wrote: “So racism as a distinctively modern phenomenon is historically inseparable from white supremacy. This means that anyone can be prejudiced or bigoted against anyone else (white against black or black against white); and anyone can have racist attitudes or act in racist ways — but the target of racism specifically, as distinguished from prejudice or bigotry, is racial minorities, not white people.”

            If you’re saying racism is inseparable from white supremacy, you are saying that only white people can be racist.

            You were not unclear. You’re just backpedaling madly.

          • LOL. You literally quoted me saying “anyone can have racist attitudes or act in racist ways.” “Anyone” means “anyone.” You can cut and paste, you just don’t notice what you’re cutting and pasting.

            You also apparently don’t remember that I also said “Black people can have racist attitudes or act in racist ways.”

            You don’t understand, because you read with hostility.

        • “Bishop Braxton identified Black Lives Matter as a movement primarily with racial profiling, police brutality, and racial injustice.”

          Then Bishop Braxton hasn’t been paying attention. It’s a movement primarily of spite, venom, destruction, Marxism, and an attempt to destroy history.

          “If you were to poll Americans on what BLM means to them, at least 6 out of 10 would pick those issues.”

          In that case, at least 6 out of 10 Americans are clueless.

          “She added that neither the phrase nor the movement should be viewed through the lens of only one organization. “It’s a mistake to say that Black Lives Matter—the organization—is the head of this movement.””

          Gosh, how could anybody confuse “Black Lives Matter” with “black lives matter?”

          • You are quibbling about what racism means in a dictionary. Toss out the meaning of the word.

            Look rather at the suffering it has caused, loss of dignity, humiliation, injustice, the arrogance of the “Gente Non Sancta”. It is all an offence against God. All those who practice racism will in no way escape the wrath of God, in this life or the next. And a warning to the victims of racism from Christ, “Do not fear those who can kill your body but cannot touch your soul. Rather fear him who can cast both your body and soul into hell”. We have here a case of who will lose their souls and who will win the prize. Racism is a direct hit against Jesus Christ, “Whatever you do to the least of my brothers you DO unto me”. It behooves me that there are actually people who believe as they believe immunity from civil law, they also believe they have immunity from God’s law. This is the most deranged form of thinking. They will certainly see things differently when God calls us from this life to eternity. When it comes to racism it would be a good thought to meditate on the Four Last Things, Death, Judgement, Heaven, Hell. What would cause a person to believe they are immune from God’s Divine Wrath? The answer may be that Modernists eradicated fear of the Lord during their rampage with demolishing the Church of where Outside there is No Salvation.

          • “You are quibbling about what racism means in a dictionary. Toss out the meaning of the word.”

            The dictionary tells the meaning of the word. Otherwise you make up your own meaning and end up like Humpty Dumpty in “Through the Looking-Glass:”

            ““When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.’

            “’The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’

            “’The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master — that’s all.'”

            I used the dictionary definition because that is the established meaning of the word, and I refuse to let you or anyone else change the definition to fit their own purposes and to bully and attack perfectly decent people.

            You decide that by your definition, whatever it is, is out there and that the people who you think are racist are damned. I suggest that before you start damniing other people you take a look at your own behavior; you are putting yourself in God’s place and pronouncing judgment of those whom you have decided are racist according to your particular definition.

            One other thing: You sound as if you believe that anyone who dislikes you must so so because of whichever racial group it is that you you are Hispanic (which, incidentally, isnt a race). Ponder the thought that your ethnic background might have nothing to do with your unlikeability.

            Meanwhile, you’re perfectly content to watch as Black Lives Matter and their close allies Antifa destroy statues of people like St. Junipero Serra, are you?

        • SDG, I have found your comments helpful in understanding some of the disconnect I have on this topic, especially below where you explain how you view the word racism. Thank you for giving a clear definition of what you mean. I have not understood the word in this way and was taught that racism had to do with prejudiced characterizations based on skin color. That being the case, I can understand why many white people object to prejudiced characterizations of white people, and see this as a form of racism. If it is helpful to you at all, I can say from my own experience as a “white“ person ( I’m actually kind of olive- ish) I have experienced hostility, prejudice, threats…because I’m white. I have been called derogatory names and as a person who lived in a mostly minority populated area, I was at times a target for unjust treatment ie. being excluded from groups, ignored in shops, watched suspiciously, threatened with violence etc. just for being “white”. I have always considered this to be racism, as I viewed it as an unjust hatred and vilification of me, based purely on my appearance and my minority status in that neighborhood. I would imagine many white people would have a similar usage for the word racism as I have. It is helpful, though to understand your viewpoint. It explains why I’ve had so many conversations about this topic that I couldn’t understand.

  12. The Church ‘leaders’ contributing to this article made me think of ‘the adversary’ trying to negotiate with Jesus in Sacred Scripture. Woe to those who lead my little one astray! No Catholic can justify any association with the ‘leaders’ of BLM inasmuch as they don’t recognize the value of the lives of the little ones; the most defenseless lives of all. Any cleric who encourages working with this amalgam of anti-Catholic groups under the umbrella of BLM becomes the advocate of the adversary; wolves in sheep’s clothing!

  13. Less likely be absorbed into a broadly putrid agenda, or to simply evolve into a factional and tired cliche–would be to support “Justice Matters;” unlike the “Black Live SMATTER Global Network Foundation” (intransitive verb meaning to talk superficially, to babble).

  14. If Bishop Braxton is proposing the Church work with Black Lives Matter, he can expect the collection plate to become even emptier than it is now. Many of us have learned to vote with our dollars. This is a terrorist group, nothing less. “Institutional racism” would be impossible to prove in a US where a Black man was TWICE voted in as President, a feat impossible without a significant white vote.Add in the numerous Mayors, police officers, police chiefs and other high ranking office holders of color, and you have no ground to stand on. “Institutional racism” does make a nice slogan however, for signs to wave when not rioting, or for shouting at people whose racial position you do not know. I know that I will NEVER support an organization whose net position is to blame today’s white people as a group for past historic problems they never caused, and make demands for reparations and “taking a knee”. I see ZERO difference between this group and any group of insurrectionists I have ever learned about. French Revolution or Cuban, what is a certainty is that this is heading in the same direction,spinning out of control, and more victims will certainly follow. Statues are toppled and history being re-written, people forced to chose between free speech and their jobs. Doubtless re-education camps are next. Government leaders need to stop the burning and looting NOW. If the locals wont do it then the feds need to step in with whatever means they need. Group guilt will not wash with a large number of us.This has nothing to do with race and everything to do with right and wrong. Maybe someone should gently inform the Bishop before me makes a significant tactical error.

  15. If I may, how can anyone calling themselves Catholic support the racism of the BLM movement? All lives matter, but that is deemed racist by the proponents of this Marxist ideology.

  16. Ms Purvis might know that she isn’t agreeing with the BLM organization but the news, unfortunately, shows only the BLM political organization. This can cause people, who know she is Catholic, to think that the Church supports all of BLM’s agenda. I agree with Ryan Bombeger who says the Church should be leading on this. Why not have “All Black Lives Are Sacred” or “All BLACK LIVES SHOULD BE TREASURED”. Why must it only Be Black Lives Matter?

  17. This is a welcome article but at times I feel many of those cited fail to appreciate the sheer gravity of the situation. BLM is an openly postmodernist/far-leftist entity entirely hostile to Church doctrine. Not only that, but it’s adherents have proven themselves time and again to be perfectly willing to engage in racially motivated violence against other persons primarily due to the pale tone of their skin. In the UK, where I live, after a week’s worth of “demonstrations” we have over sixty police officers injured, with multiple landmarks defaced or at one point torn down. BLM itself is not an “anti-racist” movement because it itself openly racist, albeit it towards a demographic that in the current political climate is collectively held responsible for past misdeeds that nobody currently living had anything to do with. The claims of BLM as to “systemic racism” also cannot be taken seriously as, specifically when it comes to police violence, no statistics exist, either in terms of the UK or US, that support their outlandish and frequently hysterical claims. This is not a question of dealing with an at times rational movement for “social justice” and where it may or may not part ways with Church doctrine – BLM is openly hostile to not just the Christian faith but the family, natural reason, the sanctity of human life and what’s left of western civilisation as a whole.

  18. One question that I’ve always wanted to have answered is: where does street smarts end and profiling and racism begin? Street smarts requires situational awareness, and accurate threat assessment. There are high crime inner city neighborhoods with gang-bangers where people traveling the streets are clay pigeons in a shooting gallery. There street smarts can be a matter of life or death.
    *
    Weak, corrupt leadership is increasingly turning many cities into war zones. War zones produce military rules of engagement.
    *
    Charges of racism have become the default position of the political left. For them everything is always racism 24/7/365. The charge has been so broadly applied that it has been rendered largely meaningless as a term for use in public dialog. The boy that cried wolf comes to mind.

  19. My comments have not been posted. Is this a Donald Trump site, where we cannot speak against the Emperor of the now destroyed “Divided States of America”. After all the evil of the traitor Trump has done, I can’t believe how he has become the Pachamama of traditional Catholic sites.

  20. If “black lives” mattered to BLM, they would care about the literally hundreds of thousands of black lives destroyed in utero every year in America.

    Not to mention the thousands of black lives taken by other blacks In our cities.

    And they would favor the kinds of stable families and quality schools that are our best defense against crime and ignorance and death.

    IMO, there are no “black lives” or “white lives” or “left-handed lives” or “right-handed lives.”

    They are all “human lives,” and every single one matters.

    I’m not sure any of those matter to BLM.

    I think power is all that matters to them.

  21. The church needs to deal with it’s own deeply embedded racism before it can level any meaningful critique of BLM. We are all broken in some shape and form. When will we learn to come together based on a common philosophy of doing good to right the wrongs of this world.

    If the church comes out with strong support for this righteous movement – this action could single-handedly lead many to the Lord. Use this an opportunity to evangelise by being the body of the Lord in the world.

    This is God’s Church, it’s not a social club. I ask this question because I’ve read on this thread where someone says people will take away their money! I find these ideologies disturbing as they run contrary to Christian doctrine.

    If ever the Church is in doubt about what to do – just ask yourself, ‘what would Jesus do.

    Are we aiming for everlasting life or everlasting condemnation?

    • “The church needs to deal with it’s own deeply embedded racism before it can level any meaningful critique of BLM.”

      It must be so deeply embedded that it’s not obvious anymore. Sure, there are undoubtedly Catholics who are racist. But is the Church herself filled with “deeply embedded racism”?

      And why are Catholics not able to make reasoned judgments about the BLM movement regardless of problems in the Church? This sort of “thinking” is ludicrous. In short, you are trying to pull a weird form of shaming, or even emotional blackmailing, in which Catholics who have serious qualms about the BLM movement are being told to shut up until “X, Y, and Z” happen. It’s offensive and insulting in every way.

      • One area the Catholic church needs to address is the Doctrine of Discovery and Terra Nullius. It is to my mind a glaring contradiction of the message of Jesus and is to my mind inherently racist. Can I bring to readers attention a Canadian document that covers much detail of the Doctrine of Discovery.
        The “Doctrine of Discovery” and Terra Nullius:
        A Catholic Response

        https://www.commonword.ca/FileDownload/22361/catholic_response_to_doctrine_of_discovery_and_tn.pdf?t=1

        and a 2015 article by by Vinnie Rotondaro from NCR
        https://www.ncronline.org/news/justice/doctrine-discovery-scandal-plain-sight
        [quote]
        In 2009, the Episcopal Church repudiated the Doctrine of Discovery.

        In 2012, The Unitarian Universalist Association followed suit. Other religious groups — the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), the World Council of Churches, New York Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, the United Methodist church, to name a few — have also repudiated it.

        But the Vatican has refused to publicly address Catholicism’s role in bringing about the Doctrine of Discovery, or revoke the papal bulls that articulated it. Perhaps, then, it is not surprising to find that most Catholics know almost nothing about it.

        Libby Comeaux, a lawyer and co-member of the Loretto Community, recalls the first time the Loretto sisters were confronted by the history. It was January 2012. Comeaux was participating in an environmental conference in the Denver metro area, of which the Loretto community was a sponsor.”*

        “A number of Loretto sisters and members were at the gathering,” Comeaux said, “and one of the themes was the rights of nature, public trust, that sort of thing, as it applied to water. And a law professor from Denver University stood up and started giving us some feedback that was fairly uncomfortable to hear. … He was saying, ‘You’re talking about rights of nature as if you invented this term, and you’re Catholics. What do you think about the Doctrine of Discovery? What are you doing about it?’

        “I may have been the only Catholic in the room who knew what he was talking about,” she said.

        In November 2013, the Loretto community sent a letter to Pope Francis.

        The letter called on the pope to “formally and publicly repudiate and rescind the Dum Diversas Bull of 1452, and other related bulls, which grant the Pope’s blessing ‘to capture, vanquish, and subdue the Saracens, pagans, and other enemies of Christ and put them into perpetual slavery and to take all their possession and their property.’ We also call upon the Pope to repudiate and rescind the Inter Caetera Bull of 1493 that granted authority to Spain and Portugal to ‘take all lands and possessions’ so long as no other Christian ruler had previously claimed them. These bulls instilled the Doctrine of Discovery, the papal sanctioning of Christian enslavement and power over non-Christians.”
        [end quote]

        • In the Great Jubilee Pope St. John Paul II did issue an historic and omnibus APOLOGY and Prayer for Forgiveness of the Sins of the Church (March 12, 2000).

          http://www.vatican.va/content/john-paul-ii/en/homilies/2000/documents/hf_jp-ii_hom_20000312_pardon.html

          “[….] we cannot fail to recognize the infidelities to the Gospel committed by some of our brethren, especially during the second millennium […] Let us confess, even more, our responsibilities as Christians for the evils of today [….] We humbly ask forgiveness for the part which each of us has had in these evils by our own actions, thus helping to disfigure the face of the Church. [….] At the same time […] let us forgive the sins committed by others against us [….]. [Of course, no responses, not even from our Protestant brethren.]

          At OTHER TIMES Pope St. John Paul II issued other more specific apologies:

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_apologies_made_by_Pope_John_Paul_II
          Regarding the linked DOCTRINE OF DISCOVERY, too bad about the internet link itself and the signature block….In this deceptive day and age, might an overly-cautious reader detect CODE LANGUAGE (?) in these bookend elements?

          Does the link to “a common word” echo the truncated Islamic—and pluralist—heading from the Qur’an to Pope Benedict’s Regensburg Address (2007)? The complete verse (surah) of what is ostensibly “common” with Islam eliminates both the Trinity and the Apostolic Succession: “O People of the Scripture! Come to a common word as between us and you: [AND] that we worship none but God and that we shall ascribe no partner unto Him, that we erect not, from among ourselves, lords and patrons other than Allah.” (Q 3:64)].

          And why does the signature block insert for Joseph the interchangeable gay “marriage” term “husband” (or “wife”) instead of the binary term with Joseph as “spouse”? In progressive Canada is anything going on here between the lines, unnoticed by the signing bishops? (“March 19, 2016 Solemnity of Saint Joseph, husband of the Blessed Virgin Mary Principal patron [patroness?] of Canada”). Moreover, the patron saints of Canada are listed, instead, as St. Anne, St. Joseph, St. John the Baptist and St. Jean de Brebeuf.

          • Peter, the link was to a Mennonite online bookstore, for the document that i saw as relevant to this discussion.The title of the document, together with the signatories indicates it’s authenticity as a Catholic perspective. I’m not understanding much or your response. What is the signature block? The bookend elements of quote end quote i put in myself as as happened before when i quote another source some here have taken it to be my writing. I don’t know coding language etc so there is no skulduggery involved. If you are knowledgable with respect to coding I seek your advise, should i not bookend as I did? Thanks for pointing out the apologies made by Pope John Paul II. Those who where most disadvantaged by The Doctrine of Discovery are still waiting for it to be rescinded. Repentance involves a 180 degree turn from the sinful behaviour and the pursuit of a journey in this new opposite direction and on that journey we discover the joy that is present in the midst of adversity and the power of love to change the world.

        • Mr. Hallam,
          It’s a bit off track but where are the apologies from Muslims for the million plus European Christians who were captured and sold into slavery in North Africa and the Ottoman Empire? That was the most lucrative slave industry going before the Atlantic market opened up.
          I would agree that the folks with the deepest injuries are the native cultures that suffered almost complete decimation and to this day endure living conditions and lifespans far below the rest of the population.

    • In the clerical abuse scandal, sexual abuse is often accompanied by financial abuse. I rarely hear news about the Vatican bank that doesn’t have the stench of corruption. And where do you think that the payouts for the clerical abuse scandal comes from? The collection plate looks like it is treated very much like a clerical abuse slush fund. Judas Iscariot was the first Apostolic treasurer, and stole from out of the Apostolic purse. It would appear that his spirit is all too alive and well in the modern Church.

  22. Perhaps instead of all the ink spent on BLM, a writer for CWR should interview Candace Owens at Blexit. If you want reason, she’s got it, passion for her cause, too.
    .
    BLM gets far more press than it deserves, because people like articles on violence, death, destruction. Click bait that generates advertising money. Blexit doesn’t engage in those things, and so gets far, far less press than it deserves.

  23. This is not a Catholic discussion. It is politics and should not be clothed as a meaningful debate designed to spiritually uplifting us. My shame to have read this on a Holy day, Sunday. We have a Father in Heaven. That is why we should not focus on this world and politics. Your article is drawing division in the name of the Lord. There is a possibility we might lose Jesus as we spell out our differences. Luke 2: 41-43
    I was looking for God in the wrong place like Mary and Joseph. Instead I found the fallen angel, busy working full time.
    Ezekiel 28: 12-16
    Revelation 2: 2-5
    My humble advise to the moderator is to take note and claim this verses as your guiding light:

    Isaiah 1:18
    1John 4:7
    Love is the greatest of them all, so please share it with us in your journalism or else what would be the point? The Catholic Church is Universal. We are all one big family regardless of who we think we are. God is OUR father. We say the “Our father ” prayer everyday. TWhere the Father is, that’s our home. All of us.

    • “This is not a Catholic discussion. It is politics…”

      Ah, yes, the ol’ “Hey, Catholic shouldn’t talk about politics. And, by the way, everything is political. So shut up!” approach.

      No thanks.

  24. Carl, I am praying for you because your work does not come from God. You pray for me too. We are all unworthy creatures. Your current article is not bringing light into our lives but darkness. Do you not remember what Christ said, “give Ceasar what is due to Caesar.” Politics has its place and this is not the right place. Also, “Blessed are the peacemakers they shall be called sons/daughters of God.” May the good Lord forgive us for using this platform not to share His love, but to promote the fallen angel’s agenda. Devide and rule. We are all God’s children. Moderator, love God above all and your neighbours regardless, Christ said we should love our enemies. Pray for those you think are not worth your glance because we are all nothings, just sinners and it is Christ who is our salvation.

    • “Carl, I am praying for you because your work does not come from God.”

      You’re making it a tad difficult for me to take you seriously.

        • Indeed. I learned a long time ago to find the humor in such nonsense. Of course, a mind is a terrible thing to waste. But I can only do what I can do.

    • “Politics has its place and this is not the right place.”

      “This” being CWR? And what do you know of CWR? What do you know of politics? What do you know of Catholic social doctrine?

      Spouting platitudes is fine, but your little lectures are of little value when it comes to assessing the pros and cons of various cultural, social, and political movements.

      Worse, you make a host of judgments about motives and dispositions that have no basis in what in the article in question, never mind in reality. It’s more than a bit bothersome that you judge the hearts of people (including myself) but then insist that it’s wrong to prudentially judge the public actions and words of people and movements. Care to address that glaring bit of hypocrisy?

      • I may be ignorant of most political matters, but that is a choice because God is never about politics. Pope Francis comes to mind, when he said not to profess ideology over faith. I think you will find that most of Jesus’s Apostles were not educated in political matters either. God is love. We all have a duty, as Catholics, as Christians to love one another. I do apologise if my comments have led you to think that I am judging you. I just think moderators should be neutral and since this is about BLM and our faith, well show us the Scriptures that support your arguments. We all have a duty to promote love as Christians not division and hatred. That belongs to those who do not live for Christ. Unity is paramount to our faith not politics. The earth is the Lord’s and all that is in it, the world and those who live in it Psalm 24:1.

  25. Christopher–Good questions. For clarification:

    (1) Bookend has nothing to do with your quotes; but rather the opening reference to “common word” and then to the closing block of signatures (signature block) from the Canadian bishops on the Doctrine of Discovery.

    (2) It seems I have fallen behind the times. It used to be that “code language” did not mean only computer coding language, but referred to the use of deceptive terms having double meanings. The use of “husband” (vs spouse) and “patron” (vs patroness) are non-binary LGBTQ terms, as explained in my comment. Clever, I speculate, to deliver the Doctrine of Discovery in such wrapping paper, with the bishops signing one message while also unwittingly endorsing (yes?) another.

    • Thanks Peter for the clarification. If indeed what you are suggesting is the case, it would be regrettable. The way i see it, a deliberate conflating of controversial issues more than muddies the waters and would be an obstacle to valid endeavors to address issues of unjust treatment of indigenous peoples and those disadvantaged or persecuted because of their racial origin.

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