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Love In an age of tolerance and abortion

People accuse us of “hate” because we won’t lie about God’s love, about the love to which He calls us.

(Image: Josh Applegate | Unsplash.com)

One of the accusations most often leveled against Catholics is that we are “intolerant.” The world calls us intolerant because we don’t accept everything people do without question or protest. It’s a somewhat bitter irony that if you want to see real intolerance, just dare to oppose the world on one of its favorite issues of the day!

The “tolerance” question has come to the fore once again in the wake of recent legislation (and proposed legislation) restricting abortion in a number of states across the country. Pro-abortion advocates can no longer argue that we don’t know when human life begins—science has settled beyond doubt that it begins at conception. So, the next line of argumentation is that we ought to “live and let live.” Particularly, it is said that we must not tell women what to do with their bodies (ignoring the fact that it’s the unborn child’s body that faces a mortal threat from abortion).

Yet there are many instances for any society in which to “live and let live” is impossible. And God did not create the Church merely so that we might be tolerant of other people. Tolerance has a place in this world, but God does not call us to be merely tolerant of other people. He calls us to love them.

Have you ever had a person in your life whom you merely tolerated? Maybe a family member or friend you forgave for something he did to you but never really got beyond just putting up with him? That’s what tolerance is, just putting up with people—not a bad thing, but not a very good one either.

God calls us to love because that’s what God does: “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son” (Jn 3:16). In his First Letter, St. John tells us, “Beloved, let us love one another, because love is of God” (4:7). In John’s Gospel, Jesus says, “As the Father loves me, so I also love you” (15:9).

God has not ever, for one millisecond, just “put up” with us. His love is the very reason we exist in the first place. God’s love is what gives us our identity, our dignity, and our destiny. There is nothing good we have that is not somehow the result of God’s love for us.

At the same time, while God’s love is constant and unconditional, His love calls us to be better than we are today. There is a saying that “God loves us right where we’re at, and He loves us too much to leave us there.” Love and truth always go together. Love never lies. In that sense, love can be kind of annoying, a bother, as any teenager would gladly tell you at one point or another regarding his parents.

God will not “just leave us alone”, and He won’t lie to us about our sins, about our need for repentance and conversion, about our total dependence upon Him for everything.

The world will lie to us. The world makes life all about you, telling you that you can do anything you set your mind to, that you should feel free to do anything your heart desires, that every difference is just about “diversity,” regardless of how these differences match-up with God’s will, His plan for us.

This is where Catholics get into trouble with the world. People accuse us of “hate” because we won’t lie about God’s love, about the love to which He calls us. We won’t lie and pretend that God’s plan means nothing in this world. We won’t lie and cast His teaching aside, ignoring its proper role in directing our lives, from the way we treat the unborn, to the way we recognize and honor marriage, to the way we treat the poor, the sick, and the elderly. Life is not just about us; it’s about God and His plan for the Church and for all of humanity.

Throughout Scripture, the Lord makes it crystal clear that His love is for every person, and that He does not discriminate against anyone when it comes to joining His Church and becoming united with Jesus Christ. One of the most beautiful elements of the Catholic faith is to see it expressed in every place and culture around the world. The Gospel truly finds a home wherever there are people who will listen to God’s word and believe in Him.

God loves us all, He desires every person to be saved (I Tim 2:4), and He sends us to share the Gospel with every person (Mt 28:19; Mk 16:15). He calls, but we also need to answer His call, both when we first accept the faith and then throughout our lives. Jesus says:

• “Whoever has my commandments and observes them is the one who loves me” (Jn 14:21);
• “If you keep my commandments, you will remain in my love” (Jn 15:10);
• “You are my friends if you do what I command you” (Jn 15:14).

Jesus loves us more than we could possibly imagine, but the way we live our lives matters to Him. We need to say “yes” to Him with our thoughts, words, and actions, even when it is most difficult. And this is how we are to love each other—steadfastly, unconditionally, totally, but not with a false love that would have us just shrugging our shoulders at sin. Precisely because we love, we want what is best for other people. We want them to know and love Jesus. We want them to live good lives, to be saved, to avoid hell and go to heaven!

Returning to the current abortion debates, God calls us neither to tolerate murder nor to condemn those who support or commit these gravely evil acts. He calls us to condemn the sin of abortion, to work for its elimination, and to demonstrate divine, self-sacrificing love for unborn children, their parents, and all who in any way are involved with or impacted by the conflict in which our nation is engaged over the right to life.

Of course, we can’t show this kind of challenging love by feeling, let alone acting, as if we’re better than other people. The first thing I know about sin is that I am a sinner! I’ve learned a lot about sin through teaching, reading, and observation, but I first learned about sin by experience. And it is in knowing the depths of my own sinfulness that I come to appreciate the mind-boggling magnitude of God’s love for me, and then become ready to share that love with others.

The love of God becomes present to us in the most powerful way we can experience here on earth in the Holy Eucharist. Each time we offer the Body and Blood of Jesus on the altar of sacrifice, we are called to offer God our lives, committing ourselves to love people as He loves them, even at the cost of our bodies and our blood. In this way, the world will see in us not just tolerance, but the burning love of Jesus Christ, a love that will not rest until all of those God calls are united with Him and worship at one altar, sharing in one heavenly destiny.


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About Fr. Charles Fox 21 Articles
Rev. Charles Fox is an assistant professor of theology at Sacred Heart Major Seminary, Detroit. He holds an S.T.D. in dogmatic theology from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas (Angelicum), Rome.

6 Comments

  1. ‘God calls us not to condemn those who support or commit these gravely sinful acts’

    Nonsense. God calls me to do just that.

  2. Dear Father,

    Well, maybe.

    This morning I read a well-known lay Catholic’s review of a film that faults the portrayal of Jesus with:

    “…he comes across as a kind of manic homeless man who may once have worked as an orderly at a state-run psychiatric hospital…Or was he a patient?”

    Why does a Catholic, in reviewing a movie, make a cruel and irrelevant aside about psychiatric patients and about hospital orderlies? Why does he mock those in need of care? And is there something wrong about serving humanity as an orderly? Maybe next we will be treated to sneers at hospital laundry workers or LVNs or radiology technicians.

    There is a famous ‘blogging priest whose obsessions with the sex lives of others – he has focused on public-school teachers in the past but may have gotten over it – are just plain creepy. Imagine a man who identifies public-school teacher posting often his obsessions about the sex lives of priests (and it probably happens).

    There is another famous ‘blogging priest who posts pictures of his luxury meals during his frequent trips even as he faults Catholics who are not as traditional as he is.

    I am old enough to remember when the fashion among the really cool Catholics was to bash veterans. In the mid-1970s a priest at the cathedral in San Diego mentioned during Mass that on that day in 1944 he was a young Marine making a landing on an island in the Pacific, and by the end of the week he was one of only six in his company still alive. He then asked us to pray for the dead and the survivors of both sides. A number of Catholics, outraged, walked out.

    Many years ago, through the witness of good, loving Catholic men and women, I was led to the Faith. A similar young man today would probably dimiss the faith after considering the stereotyping, resentment, and even hate demonstrated by Catholics on the InterGossip.

    And, yes, I need to do better.

  3. America, it is said, is suffering from intolerance-it is not. It is suffering from tolerance. Tolerance of right and wrong, truth and error, virtue and evil, Christ and chaos. Our country is not nearly so overrun with the bigoted as it is overrun with the broadminded.”

    “Tolerance is an attitude of reasoned patience toward evil … a forbearance that restrains us from showing anger or inflicting punishment. Tolerance applies only to persons … never to truth. Tolerance applies to the erring, intolerance to the error … Architects are as intolerant about sand as foundations for skyscrapers as doctors are intolerant about germs in the laboratory.

    Tolerance does not apply to truth or principles. About these things we must be intolerant, and for this kind of intolerance, so much needed to rouse us from sentimental gush, I make a plea. Intolerance of this kind is the foundation of all stability.”
    -Fulton J. Sheen

  4. Thank you Father…I have a question though…”Returning to the current abortion debates, God calls us neither to tolerate murder nor to condemn those who support or commit these gravely evil acts. He calls us to condemn the sin of abortion, to work for its elimination, and to demonstrate divine, self-sacrificing love for unborn children, their parents, and all who in any way are involved with or impacted by the conflict in which our nation is engaged over the right to life. Of course, we can’t show this kind of challenging love by feeling, let alone acting, as if we’re better than other people.”

    Got it…great…
    Now…perhaps some thought on how in this culture we should or can “condemn the sin of abortion,” and certainly some thought and help on how “to work for its elimination.” Action is desperately needed.

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