“STRIVE” offers men a challenging, unique 21-day detox from porn

The STRIVE program, says Bill Donaghy, is a “progressive journey for men, taking them deeper into their own lives and then out into the wider circles of accountability and fraternity.”

(YouTube)

Catholic apologist and anti-pornography crusader Matt Fradd has partnered with Cardinal Studios to release STRIVE: A 21-Day Detox from Porn, a new series which provides men struggling with a porn addiction the tools they need to kick the habit. Pornography is a nationwide epidemic, says Fradd, damaging the lives of both individuals and families, and destroying marriages. With eight years of experience speaking out against the harm of pornography, Fradd noted, “The No. 1 question I get is, ‘Yes, I get it’s bad, but how do I quit? What exactly do I need to do?’ This is precisely what STRIVE addresses. It meets these men where they are with an experience unlike anything that has existed.”

Bill Donaghy

Fradd is author of STRIVE, as well as several books, including Does God Exist? and The Porn Myth: Exposing the Reality Behind the Fantasy of Pornography.  He has a podcast, Pints With Aquinas. He is married with four children, and lives in Georgia. He is originally from Australia, and himself overcame a porn addiction that began in his youth.

STRIVE’s inaugural launch is March 27th. Participants sign up at www.strive21.com, and receive access to short daily videos featuring Fradd as he walks them through the steps of overcoming a porn addiction. The series includes daily challenges for men and the opportunity to participate in local or video small groups to help them with their ongoing recovery.

This series is specifically designed for men—a second series for women is in the works—and can be accessed online from anywhere in the world. It is based on the same model as Catholic apologist Chris Stefanick’s RISE Challenge in 2018.

Bill Donaghy co-authored the RISE Challenge and is a contributor to STRIVE. He is a curriculum specialist at the Theology of the Body Institute. Donaghy is an author, instructor and international speaker with over 25 years of experience in mission, evangelization and education. He is married with four children.

Donaghy recently spoke with CWR about STRIVE.

CWR: How big of a problem is pornography in the U.S.?

Donaghy: Porn has affected and infected nearly everything from cinema, TV shows, and commercials, to popular music. Everything has become sexualized and we hardly bat an eye at it; from the sale of beer to candy to cars. According to Covenant Eyes statistics, 28,258 users are watching pornography every second. $3,075.64 is spent on porn every second on the Internet. Pornhub, the world’s most popular porn website, reports that in 2017 there were 28.5 billion annual visits to the website. We live in a pornified culture. (See https://www.covenanteyes.com)

CWR: What are some of the ways it is harmful?

Donaghy: One harmful thing about viewing pornography is the fact that it misses seeing the whole person, the full beauty of woman or man. It’s harmful because it reduces the person into parts that sexually stimulate the viewer. The person who habitually looks at pornography is in this constant place of limiting a person’s worth to only their exterior, to only what pleases them.

So porn is also harmful to the growth of the person viewing it. They become trapped in a fantastical world where their needs are met by what C.S. Lewis called “an imaginary harem of women” who make no demands and never call them to any kind of responsibility. Porn is harmful to a man in particular because he doesn’t learn to get outside of himself and into the beautiful mess of actual human relationships, it can hold him back from the daring and unsettling adventure of looking an actual person in the eyes and encountering her full mystery, and becoming somehow “responsible” for her as a fellow human being.

CWR: How was the idea for STRIVE developed, and how does it work?

Donaghy: STRIVE was developed to be not just a quick answer or one-time teaching about dealing with pornography, but a process, an actual journey that a man takes with other brothers. The 21-day detox from porn is this progressive journey for men, taking them deeper into their own lives and then out into the wider circles of accountability and fraternity.

CWR: Tell us a bit about Matt Fradd, who is leading the men in this 21 day journey.

Donaghy: Matt is truly a gift and we’re thrilled to have him offering his experience and expertise in this new challenge for men. The Australian accent doesn’t hurt, either! Matt’s a very humble and transparent man, who freely and boldly shares his own story of brokenness, and how the grace of God broke into his own life and continues to lead him. So, he’s sharing his wisdom not only from his study (which is massive) but from his experience in speaking to millions of people around the world.

CWR: Who were some of the other key people who made STRIVE a reality?

Donaghy: Cardinal Studios, which created the RISE 30 Day Challenge just last year, is also the producer of STRIVE. The team is made of men who deeply believe in their mission to equip everyday men with the tools needed to live a joyful life.

CWR: What was your specific role?

Donaghy: It’s been a privilege for me personally to contribute to the content of STRIVE, bringing the content of St. John Paul II’s Theology of the Body to every aspect of this walk with men. St. John Paul II’s beautiful and positive vision of the human body and human sexuality as a gift that’s never to be grasped at or used is really a signature of this entire STRIVE program.

CWR: Who should sign up and watch STRIVE?

Donaghy: The watermark behind STRIVE is clearly Catholic, but it can speak to any Christian man and, in fact, any man who sincerely wants to move beyond porn and live as a man fully alive. I would say any man also who simply struggles with sins of lust or infidelity in other ways as well. I think priests, counselors and therapists could also benefit from looking at STRIVE to serve them in their respective ministries.

CWR: Is there a cost?

Donaghy: Yes. It’s $49. For the initial launch date we are offering it at $39. But what I would say is this: pornography is a serious issue and we’ve dealt with it seriously here.  We have put everything we could into creating an experience that didn’t exist up to this point … one that will truly equip a man with what he needs to break free from pornography. If you’re struggling with pornography, if it’s tearing apart your relationships, your marriage, your family, what’s it worth to break free? $50? $500?  $5000?

We created STRIVE because we know what works and what doesn’t. We tell everyone… If you’re concerned about the cost and you truly can’t afford it, please reach out to us and we will help you get into the challenge. But again, if you’re serious about quitting pornography, not only is there a monetary cost that’s involved, there’s going to be a time commitment and it’s going to stretch you because you’re trying to become the man God is calling you to be, and that will never be comfortable.

CWR: What other programs like STRIVE are in the works?

Donaghy: Besides the RISE 30-Day Challenge with me and Chris Stefanick, and STRIVE, we’re also working on a Parent’s Series for STRIVE, as well as a women’s and teen version.


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About Jim Graves 166 Articles
Jim Graves is a Catholic writer living in Newport Beach, California.

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