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“But always think this: do not be afraid of failure. Do not be afraid of falling.”
Pope Francis meets students from Jesuit schools at an audience in the Paul VI Hall at the Vatican June 7.

Today Pope Francis met with a large crowd of young people from Jesuit schools during an audience at the Vatican. While the Holy Father had prepared a speech to deliver to the students (that text can be read here), he decided not to read it and instead engaged the students in a lively question-and-answer session.

From the Vatican Radio report on the meeting:

The students, who had come from six Italian cities and one school in Albania, were passing the time singing a Christian rap song, when the Pope entered the hall unannounced. At his sighting, they immediately erupted into cheers and applause. 

In response, it seems, Pope Francis decided to put his five-page written message aside.

“I prepared a text, but it’s five pages! A little boring,” he said to the young people, who responded with laughter.

He proposed to give short summary and then take questions from the students instead.

With sensitivity and humour, the Pope answered 10 frank questions, that ranged from his priestly vocation to his decision to forego the usual papal apartment. 

When asked if it was a difficult to leave his family and friends and become a priest, the pope said it was. “It is not easy but there are beautiful moments and Jesus helps you and gives you some joy.” 

When asked why he wanted to join the Jesuits, he said he wanted to be a missionary and he was attracted by the religious order’s missionary zeal and activity. 

When asked why he decided to renounce the usual papal apartment, he said it was a question of personality, not of luxury. 

“I have a need to live among people.” he said. “If I were to live alone, perhaps a little isolate, it would not be good for me. … It is my personality. … It is not an issue of personal virtue, it is only that I cannot live alone.”

He added that the poverty in the world today is a scandal. “All of us today must think about how we can become a little poorer,” he said, so as to resemble Jesus. 

The Pope addressed more serious concerns as well. 

When a student doubting his faith asked for words of encouragement, he likened the faith a long walk. “To walk is an art,” he said, “To walk is the art of looking at the horizon, thinking about where I want to go but also enduring the fatigue. And many times, the walk is difficult, it is not easy… There is darkness… even days of failure… one falls… 

"But always think this: do not be afraid of failure. Do not be afraid of falling. In the art of walking, what is important is not avoiding the fall but not remaining fallen," he said. "Get up quickly, continue on, and go. … But it is also terrible to walk alone, terrible and boring. Walking in community with friends, with those who love us, this helps us and helps us get to the end.”

 
About the Author
Catherine Harmon catherine.harmon@catholicworldreport.com

Catherine Harmon is managing editor of Catholic World Report.
 
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